Lane Ledoux

Lynn Fraser’s Stillpoint Method of Healing Trauma changed my life.

If you want to understand your own Fight/ Flight/ Freeze/ Fawn reactions, find relief from your own inner critic, investigate, as Oprah says not “What’s wrong with you?” but “What happened to you?” I believe you have come to the right place.

Lane lives in Leamington, Ontario, Canada five minutes from Point Pelee National Park on the north shore of Lake Erie. She received a B.A. from the University of Windsor. Having completed a three year intensive training, she is a Stillpoint Method Certified Guide and is now a Certified Facilitator of the Kiloby Inquiries, a new model of recovery from suffering. A certified Prana-Vidya Yoga Teacher, she shares this passion with seniors through Leamington’s Half Century Club.

Lane had been seeking relief from a difficult childhood since her mid-thirties. While married and working outside the home she sought psychologists, counsellors, and mentors. Talk therapy laid the groundwork for Lynn Fraser’s Healing Trauma, The Stillpoint Method. Trauma, experience too intense to be processed in real time, is stored in the body. Slowly, gently, safely exploring that experience as an adult allows trauma to be processed. It no longer drives reaction, but allows time and space for reasoned response.

“I love to refer people to Lane Ledoux for mindfulness inquiry because I know they are safe with her. Lane brings her steady presence, the depth of her own awakening, a nuanced understanding of how trauma works, and direct experience of healing in her nervous system and her life. You are in good hands with Lane.” Lynn Fraser, Stillpoint 

Book a free 20 minute consult or a session, https://calendly.com/laneledoux or Email laneledoux@gmail.com.
($50 USD 1 session, 5 sessions for $225 USD)


We facilitate people using a somatic mindfulness inquiry. Lynn Fraser is a senior meditation teacher in the Himalayan Tradition, an ordained minister, and a certified Kiloby Inquiries facilitator. Lane Ledoux is a certified Stillpoint Method Guide and a certified Kiloby Inquiries facilitator.

The information provided on this site is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical or clinical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Never disregard professional medical or clinical advice, or delay in seeking it, because of something you have read or seen on this site. Never rely on information here in place of seeking professional medical or clinical advice. We not responsible or liable for your interpretation of this material. 

Lynn and Lane are facilitators of a somatic mindfulness inquiry, not doctors or therapists. You are encouraged to consult with your doctor or therapist with regard to this information contained here. 


The Parking Lot Incident

Each interaction is a classroom.

I was driving in a parking lot and my passenger said: “They want out.”

One benefit of having seen my core deficiency beliefs clearly, those powerful, unconscious drivers of reactivity, is the automatic lessening of people-pleasing behavior. I did not look around the parking lot trying to figure out which car he meant, anxiously asking “Where?”

I just said: “What does that mean?” and kept driving. He said, “They’re trying to turn.” Again, I said, “What does that mean?” “I guess that means get out of the way.” By then the parking lot had cleared.

I’m pleased my behavior has changed.

His behavior: he’s in a car with me, more worried about a stranger he thinks I’m inconveniencing than he is about me, my discomfort, my well-being. Today, having completed Lynn’s Find Your Stillpoint program, that doesn’t work for me.

Part of the freedom that comes from Stillpoint work is the ability to see what’s happening in real time and to respond to it appropriately. A great relief.

My passenger is doing this inquiry work. After we talked about it, he said putting pressure on me with his concern for a stranger was “really screwed up.”

Regardless of his response, it’s wonderful to be able to understand what happened, speak about it calmly, move away from those who can’t see yet, and move carefully, slowly toward those who can.